How to Make Quinoa Flour

Gluten-free baking requires a little bit of creativity, and a lot of substitutions. Sometimes, those can be pretty pricey! A better option is to buy dry ingredients in bulk and then use them to make your own flours and flour mixtures. Simply take your grain (quinoa, oats, brown rice, etc.) and blend for 2 minutes or so in a high-speed food processor. This should give you a nice, granular flour. For even better quinoa flour, try these simple instructions.

1. Measure out 2 cups of quinoa.

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2. Toast the quinoa in a skillet over medium heat for about 5 minutes, stirring occasionally.

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3. Quinoa will make a light popping sound when the toasting begins. You want this sound for about a minute or two.

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4. Let quinoa cool.

5. Add to a food processor and blend on high until you get a fine flour.

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6. This can’t be used as a 1:1 flour substitute, but makes a great addition to flour mixes or in addition to other flour substitutes.

67 Comments Add your own

  • 1. Gluten-free Baking « homemadeadventure  |  June 9, 2011 at 12:02 pm

    [...] flour and oat flour. I made both of these myself for the purpose of experimentation, so you can see how to do that here! It is essentially just your grain of choice (oats, quinoa, brown rice, etc.) that is [...]

    Reply
  • [...] It turned out pretty good and is incidentally gluten-free. I used this tutorial as a touchstone: http://homemadeadventure.wordpress.com/how-tos/how-to-make-quinoa-flour/. But I just started with 1/2 a cup of quinoa rather than the 2 cups she [...]

    Reply
  • 3. Vanessa  |  March 20, 2012 at 8:43 am

    Do you need to toast the quinoa or can you just blend it to make the flour skipping that part?

    Reply
    • 4. homemadeadventure  |  March 20, 2012 at 10:36 am

      Toasting it gives it a richer flavor and also helps make it dry enough to process well. You can try it without roasting it though, I just haven’t!

      Reply
  • 5. Lydia Absar  |  April 29, 2012 at 4:47 pm

    how would you use this in addition to rice flour or the like? Half and Half?

    Reply
    • 6. homemadeadventure  |  May 4, 2012 at 9:20 am

      I think half and half should work. You can play around with the substitutions, which I have not done much of, too be honest. Let me know what you learn!

      Reply
  • 7. Momie  |  May 2, 2012 at 12:58 pm

    I have a Cuisinart 12 cup food processor. Would it work or do I need something else?

    Reply
    • 8. homemadeadventure  |  May 4, 2012 at 9:19 am

      That will work! Just make sure the quinoa is dry and you keep an eye on it!

      Reply
  • 9. Crystal  |  May 2, 2012 at 4:17 pm

    2 cups dry quinoa makes how much flour?

    Reply
    • 10. homemadeadventure  |  May 4, 2012 at 9:19 am

      If I recall, it made between 2 – 2 1/2 cups. I don’t recall measuring exactly though!

      Reply
  • 11. Allergy Friendly Family  |  May 29, 2012 at 11:20 pm

    This worked great. Hope its ok to share your link on my blog

    Reply
  • 13. Sammie Hunter  |  August 14, 2012 at 8:51 am

    Most raw quinoa says to rinse before using. What about the need to rinse quinoa before making flour? Just curious. I really want to try this, because quinoa flour is expensive, I use a lot of quinoa flour.

    Reply
    • 14. homemadeadventure  |  August 17, 2012 at 6:12 pm

      You can rinse, and the toasting step should take out all of the extra moisture, just make sure to drain it really well!

      Reply
    • 15. Lee  |  September 8, 2012 at 3:57 pm

      Sammie Hunter,

      Tapioca flour is a cheaper wheat- & gluten-free option.

      Also, try buckwheat flakes for porridge.

      Reply
  • 16. Susan  |  September 28, 2012 at 4:42 pm

    Do you rinse the quinoa first?

    Reply
    • 17. Susan  |  September 28, 2012 at 5:05 pm

      Sorry, just saw you answered that. Can you get away without rinsing it or does it need to be rinsed if the package says so?

      Reply
      • 18. Elena  |  October 2, 2012 at 9:50 am

        Susan, the rinsing and toasting do the same thing: removing the outer saponins on the shell of the seed. The saponins are what give quinoa the bitter taste, when they aren’t removed. So the rinsing is an unnesscessary step, and might cause you to actually “cook” your quinoa, which I imagine would make it harder to process into a flour.

        When making quinoa for any recipe, you can toast it dry or with a little oil for a minute or so first; with oil makes it cook up clump-free, more like a rice pilaf.

        Reply
  • 19. Garrett I. Barlow  |  October 5, 2012 at 11:59 am

    hmm, very cool

    Reply
  • 20. Ann  |  November 14, 2012 at 5:06 pm

    Love this idea..does quinoa flour need to be refrigerated? You know how some flours will go rancid if not refrigerated.

    Reply
    • 21. homemadeadventure  |  November 19, 2012 at 9:40 am

      I am not actually sure. I didn’t refrigerate mine and it was fine, but I also made a small-ish batch that was used up relatively quickly!

      Reply
  • 22. Ann  |  November 19, 2012 at 2:41 pm

    Thanks I’ll just make small amounts too.

    Reply
    • 23. happydemic  |  November 27, 2012 at 8:26 am

      Quinoa flour keeps for about 3 months if it is carefully sealed and kept in a cool dry place, or it can be stored for 6 months in the freezer. The relatively high fat content of quinoa flour means it will go rancid quickly if exposed to the air.

      Reply
  • [...] be used as a 1:1 substitute for all-purpose in baking recipes. While most supermarkets carry it, homemadeadventure shows how quinoa flour can be made at home in a food processor for a fraction of the [...]

    Reply
  • 25. CowboyMan  |  March 24, 2013 at 11:19 pm

    Thanks for all the posts here. Just needed to know if my Cuisinart was up to the job of flouring my bag of Quinoa. Off to the kitchen.

    Reply
  • 26. Carolina  |  March 29, 2013 at 8:13 pm

    Thank you so much for the detailed instructions! My husband has just been diagnosed with gluten intolerance and I’m excited to try the Quinoa flour. (=

    Reply
    • 27. homemadeadventure  |  April 2, 2013 at 6:46 pm

      hope it works well for you! in order to get a smooth flour, you will need to have very dry quinoa and process it for a long time. enjoy exploring gluten free baking!

      Reply
  • 28. Carolina  |  April 2, 2013 at 10:31 pm

    Thank you! I have a Vitamix and I already tried it and it worked like a champ!! :)

    Reply
  • 29. Sara  |  April 22, 2013 at 4:12 pm

    I really want to have GF flour on hand for those special occasions but don’t want to shell out a hefty price for it. I have quinoa and oats and rice. If I wanted to make a sweet bread with this flour, how much quinoa flour do I need to make a 1:1 substitution? Do I need to mix it with other grains to make the 1:1? Sorry, a total newbie and I just got my vitamix and LOVE it!

    Reply
    • 30. homemadeadventure  |  April 22, 2013 at 6:14 pm

      Volume wise, you can substitute 1:1, but this doesn’t work with all recipes since the gluten is not there to absorb water and form a network. In many pre-mixed gluten free baking flours, there is added xantham gum. I am not sure exactly how to do this for breads, but I am sure there a Google search would help to answer this!

      Reply
  • 31. cancergal  |  April 26, 2013 at 5:23 pm

    Do I need to rinse the quinoa before toasting it?
    Thanks!

    Reply
    • 32. homemadeadventure  |  April 27, 2013 at 8:00 am

      The toasting does the same thing as rinsing as far as I understand!

      Reply
  • 33. Sharman  |  May 7, 2013 at 8:04 pm

    I plan to rinse it, so do I need to dry it in the oven before grinding it into flour?

    Reply
    • 34. homemadeadventure  |  May 9, 2013 at 9:29 am

      I found that toasting it allows it to better grind into a flour. If it is wet, it will clump as you grind it.

      Reply
  • 35. Arlene  |  May 21, 2013 at 7:41 pm

    Will a blender suffice? I don’t own a food processor.

    Reply
    • 36. homemadeadventure  |  May 23, 2013 at 10:04 am

      I have never tried it in a blender. It might take longer, but is worth a try!

      Reply
  • 37. Nicole  |  July 2, 2013 at 2:10 pm

    I am making a gluten free shake and bake. It calls for one cup rice flour. I don’t have rice flour so would one cup of this work without mixing it with other flours? the mixture is just flour and spices.

    Reply
    • 38. Sandra  |  August 12, 2013 at 4:51 pm

      You may make your own rice flour in your food prosser just like the ouinoa

      Reply
  • 39. handy fishing  |  July 17, 2013 at 11:01 am

    Greetings! I know this is kinda off topic but I was wondering if you knew where I could find
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  • 40. Jeff  |  September 16, 2013 at 12:36 pm

    Anybody know if it’s harmful to add quinoa flour to my whey protein and just drink it?

    Reply
    • 41. homemadeadventure  |  November 16, 2013 at 3:21 pm

      If you get high quality, organic quinoa and toast it well first before making it into flour, I think it should be OK.

      Reply
  • 42. Nancy  |  October 13, 2013 at 10:54 am

    Suppose I want to sub quinoa flakes, could I just whirl it a couple times in the processor then use it in my recipe?

    Reply
    • 43. homemadeadventure  |  November 16, 2013 at 3:22 pm

      I have never personally worked with quinoa flakes, but its always worth an experiment!

      Reply
  • 44. Debbie  |  January 4, 2014 at 1:28 pm

    if i wanted to put the quinoa in the oven instead of stovetop would that work too?

    Reply
  • 46. Lea  |  January 13, 2014 at 4:07 pm

    How do you go about making qunioa flour with the quinoa that DOES NOT state if it is pre-washed. I called Natural Grocers and asked if it is pre-washed and he told me i need to wash it. This quinoa is from there bulk department. Please help me.

    Reply
    • 47. homemadeadventure  |  April 8, 2014 at 3:10 pm

      I am not certain, but I believe the toasting will help to dry the flour out after toasting.

      Reply
  • […] May 13, 2012 … Quinoa flour is made by grinding quinoa seeds to a fine consistency. It looks … Quinoa flour can also be added directly to soups and stews as a … How to Make Quinoa Flour | homemadeadventure […]

    Reply
  • 49. How to Make Quinoa Flour and Take Out the Bitter Taste  |  February 11, 2014 at 1:48 pm

    […] 1 – Blend your quinoa then toast it (see […]

    Reply
  • 50. Where to Buy Quinoa Flour Online  |  February 11, 2014 at 2:03 pm

    […] Mill then toast it.  (If the price of the quinoa flour makes you want to cry, it’s easy to blend your own quinoa to make […]

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  • 51. Pamela S  |  March 1, 2014 at 3:12 pm

    Thank you! I’ve been wondering how to make quinoa flour.

    Reply
  • 52. Barbara  |  March 18, 2014 at 12:50 pm

    Double Toasting? As Opt. 1 linked to this page, the instxns above mention to toast quinoa before blending into flour. The link that came to this page, then shows below opt. 1&2, to toast flour before using. So are we supposed to toast grain before blending, and then toast flour as well??

    Reply
    • 53. homemadeadventure  |  April 8, 2014 at 3:09 pm

      I only toasted the quinoa before making it into flour. Sorry for any confusion!

      Reply
  • 54. nat  |  March 18, 2014 at 3:12 pm

    Can i use quinoa flour instead of bread crumbs in a quiche?

    Reply
  • 55. nat  |  March 21, 2014 at 12:29 am

    Can i use quinoa flour in a quiche in place of regular flour?

    Reply
    • 56. homemadeadventure  |  April 8, 2014 at 3:08 pm

      Sorry for my slow response! I have not tried this specific substitution but do know that when using a gluten free flour the result is much more crumbly.

      Reply
  • 57. Tammy  |  June 4, 2014 at 12:31 pm

    Can your recipe for quinoa flour be used to make Nestle toll house chocolate chip cookies? Is the ratio 1:1 for all-purpose flour in a cookie recipe? Do I need to add any ingredients?

    Reply
    • 58. homemadeadventure  |  June 5, 2014 at 10:06 am

      I have not tried this but I do not think this can replace regular flour 1:1 in baking. You often need to add xantham gum and other replacements in gluten free flours.

      Reply
  • 59. Quinoa lovers  |  July 5, 2014 at 11:11 pm

    Quinoa is the best source of slow burning carbohydrates. Only a cup of cooked quinoa is enough to provide 8 grams of protein, 5 grams of fiber and 220 calories. Therefore, it is the best food that can be taken to shed some pounds and become fit. You can take quinoa seeds in raw, cooked or sprouted form. So just get up and get ready to experiencethe benefits of this amazing food quinoa . If you do not have this in your pantry yet, just go and get it right now

    Reply
  • 60. Cranberry Banana Bread | My great WordPress blog  |  July 17, 2014 at 9:12 pm

    […] cup (42g) quinoa flour (simply grind up quinoa in a high speed food processor/blender, click here for a […]

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  • 62. Cranberry Banana Bread  |  August 4, 2014 at 4:43 am

    […] 1/4 cup (42g) quinoa flour (simply grind up quinoa in a high speed food processor/blender, click here for a method) 1 1/2 cups (215g) buckwheat or millet flour 1/4 cup (42g) almond flour 1 […]

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  • 63. Gluten Free "White" Bread, Revisited  |  August 5, 2014 at 3:56 am

    […] or quinoa flour, they’re both easy to make!  Here is tutorial for each: chickpea flour, quinoa flour.  You can also buy both pre-made, although the cost is not really worth the tiny bit of effort […]

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  • 64. Ericka  |  August 9, 2014 at 5:48 am

    Why when quinoa is not toasted (which I just learned) tastes bitter? Would it be because it has that dusty soapy layer that it can be destroyed when toasted? Thank you

    Reply
  • 65. melsmosaic  |  August 22, 2014 at 5:13 pm

    Thanks for this! Using it to make a cookie recipe for a friend and have several friends who are gluten intolerant so it will come in handy.

    Reply
  • 66. From Quinoa to Cookie | Mel's Mosaic  |  August 25, 2014 at 4:08 pm

    […] found a great recipe for it on Homemadeadventure. You just take 2 cups of quinoa and put it in a skillet over medium […]

    Reply
  • 67. Mohamed Hassan  |  August 28, 2014 at 7:06 am

    Has anyone of you heard of the Teff Grain? It’s very common where I’m from (East Africa). I just thought to share it with ya’ll healthy ppl. Try to google it. My Ethiopian neighbors use it for everything but in Somalia it’s the main ingredient for Anjero.

    Reply

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